Paper (2009) ACM CHI: “Videolyzer: Quality Analysis of Online Informational Video for Bloggers and Journalists”

March 4th, 2009 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM UIST/CHI, Computational Journalism, Computational Photography and Video, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, S. Goldenberg, I. Essa (2009). “Videolyzer: Quality Analysis of Online Informational Video for Bloggers and Journalists.” ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI). April, 2009. [PDF] [Project Site] [Video(CHI 2009 – Digital Life New World – CHI 2009 Advance Program)

Abstract

Screen Shot of Videolyzer

Tools to aid people in making sense of the information quality of online informational video are essential for media consumers seeking to be well informed. Our application, Videolyzer, addresses the information quality problem in video by allowing politically motivated bloggers or journalists to analyze, collect, and share criticisms of the information quality of online political videos. Our interface innovates by providing a fine-grained and tightly coupled interaction paradigm between the timeline, the time-synced transcript, and annotations. We also incorporate automatic textual and video content analysis to suggest areas of interest for further assessment by a person. We present an evaluation of Videolyzer looking at the user experience, usefulness, and behavior around the novel features of the UI as well as report on the collaborative dynamic of the discourse generated with the tool.
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Paper: ACM Multimedia (2008) “Audio Puzzler: Piecing Together Time-Stamped Speech Transcripts with a Puzzle Game”

October 18th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in ACM MM, Computational Journalism, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, Papers No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, K. Luther, I. Essa (2008), “Audio Puzzler: Piecing Together Time-Stamped Speech Transcripts with a Puzzle Game.” In Proceedings of  ACM International Conference on Multimedia 2008. Vancouver, BC, CANANDA  [Project Link]

ABSTRACT

We have developed an audio-based casual puzzle game which produces a time-stamped transcription of spokenapaudio as a by-product of play. Our evaluation of the game indicates that it is both fun and challenging. The transcripts generated using the game are more accurate than those produced using a standard automatic transcription system and the time-stamps of words are within several hundred milliseconds of ground truth.

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Research: Videolyzer (Online DEMO, try it out!)

October 15th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Collaborators, Computational Journalism, Nick Diakopoulos, Projects No Comments »

An Online DEMO of Videolyzer, a project by my PhD Student, Nick Diakopolous.

Videolyzer is a tool designed to help journalists and bloggers collect, organize, and present information about the quality (i.e. validity, reliability, etc.) of online videos. It makes it possible to evaluate and make sense of things like comments, claims, and sources as they relate to the video. Users can comment and annotate pieces of the video (called “anchors”) to provide a more fine-grained description of the information in the video. The interface also incorporates a tightly integrated transcript of what’s spoken in the video to make it easier to navigate the dense information there. Finally, Videolyzer allows for collaboration among many people. Users can build off of each other’s annotations and rate each other in a form of distributed vetting and peer-evaluation.

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Paper: Pragmatic Web (2008) “An Annotation Model for Making Sense of Information Quality in Online Videos”

September 28th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Multimedia, Nick Diakopoulos, Papers No Comments »

N. Diakopoulos, I. Essa. (2008) “An Annotation Model for Making Sense of Information Quality in Online Videos.” Proceedings of the International Conference on the Pragmatic Web. 28–30 Sept. 2008, Uppsala, Sweden (To Appear)

ABSTRACT

Making sense of the information quality of online media including things such as the accuracy and validity of claims and the reliability of sources is essential for people to be well-informed. We are developing Videolyzer to address the challenge of information quality sense-making by allowing motivated individuals to analyze, collect, share, and respond to criticisms of the information quality of online political videos and their transcripts. In this paper specifically we present a model of how the annotation ontology and collaborative dynamics embedded in Videolyzer can enhance information quality.

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Research: Audio Puzzler Alpha

August 7th, 2008 Irfan Essa Posted in Computational Journalism, Nick Diakopoulos No Comments »

Audio Puzzler Alpha (ONLINE DEMO)

By Nick Diakopoulos (My PhD Student)

Audio Puzzler is a new kind of puzzle game based on unauthored content found online. The audio for the puzzles is taken from popular or interesting video clips from different genres such as news, documentary, or television. The audio puzzler is the type of game that harnesses people’s play to also provide valuable data which enriches the content played with. This is in the same vein as the ESPGame, the Listen Game, and PhotoPlay, which are all games which gather data in the process of game play. But while the data collected by these other games is useful for machine learning, the data collected with audio puzzler is immediately valuable as a transcription of the speech in the video. A similar effort (but in a much grander domain) is the Fold It project which seeks to harness playtime to solve protein folding problems. Much more detailed information about the evaluation of the technology will be forthcoming in a paper to be published at ACM Multimedia in October.

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